You have not viewed any products recently.

 

FAQs

 

FAQ Categories

General

Adoption

Foster

Questions & Answers

General

Q: Help I cannot checkout from the shopping cart

A:  

Tips for a successful checkout


Once you have entered all of your information on steps 1 – 3, the last hurdle is page 4


You will see this

first_click
You can decide to get the newsletter and leave this checked or uncheck it. If you leave it checked to receive the newsletter THEN YOU MUST PUT A CHECK MARK IN THE BELOW

second_click
If you opted in the above with a check in Receive Newsletter and do not click on the square before Newsletter, you will not be able to check out.

If you do not want to Register/Create an Account remove the check mark in the Register/Create an Account by clicking on the box before Register/Create an Account.

fifth_click


If you leave the Register/Create an Account with a check in the box then the last item is a password. If you do not have a sign in for the website, you will be automatically registered for the website. The username will be the e-mail address that you entered for billing. You need to create a new password and type it in once and then again to confirm.This will allow the order to go through.

third_click

If you have previously registered go to the top of any of the 4 pages and sign in

forth_click

back to top

Q: Why is Cairn Terrier Rescue necessary? (Is something wrong with the breed?)

A:  

People give Cairns up for the same reasons people give up any dog. Some of the reasons we hear most often are: death, illness, divorce, moving, allergies and financial problems. It is not unusual to have even the most loving household experience health or personal problems that necessitate the placement of their pets. The most common reason is that the owner doesn't have time for the dog. As a result, the Cairn could develop behavior problems from lack of attention and training. Some Cairns are abandoned on the streets, some are turned in to shelters that are only able to hold dogs a day or two, while others are obtained through auctions or kennel closures.

It is very important for people to do research before getting any breed as a family member, terriers of course, require extra effort because they are headstrong and usually really smart.  People that don't do research, don't know what to expect from the breed and turn the dog over for its natural behavior.

Fortunately, Cairns are a very adaptable breed and rescue Cairns adapt well to new situations with the proper care and training.

back to top

Q: Aren't Cairns just like Toto?

A:  

Yes, Toto was a Cairn Terrier.

TOTO: The Other Side of the Story

So, "The Wizard of Oz" is your favorite movie, you just LOVE Toto, and have always wanted a dog just like him? A dog who's small, cute, lovable, and doesn't shed all over your couch? You've done your research and learned that Cairn Terriers are (take your pick):

  • Good with children
  • Friendly
  • Loving family dogs
  • Adaptable to living in small apartments as well as large homes

Well, YES and NO.

Probably NO ONE ever told you that Cairns will almost INVARIABLY:

  • Chase squirrels
  • Chase bunnies
  • Chase bugs
  • Chase bikes
  • Chase paper fluttering down the street
  • Chase anything that moves
  • Chase things that aren't moving, just to GET them moving so they'll have something to chase
  • Bark at cars
  • Bark at bikes
  • Bark at birds
  • Bark at trikes
  • Bark at trucks
  • Bark at the phone
  • Bark at fireworks
  • Bark at thunder
  • Bark at the doorbell
  • Bark at the doorbell on TV
  • Bark to hear themselves bark
  • Bark just to get your goat -- or your attention
  • Or both
  • Bark sometimes just cause it feels so damned GREAT
  • Dig up that mouse hole
  • Dig up your tulips
  • Dig up your roses
  • Dig up your lawn
  • Dig under your fence
  • Dig under your shed
  • Dig up your linoleum
  • Dig up your carpeting
  • Nip at people's feet if you haven't redirected their intense prey drive
  • Nip at your hands too, if not trained properly
  • Try to control their universe and everything in it -- INCLUDING YOU
  • Will succeed at this unless YOU intervene. And even then, they'll try again. And again. And again and again and again and again.
  • Lunge at other dogs on leash
  • Lunge at people, unless trained not to
  • Lunge cause it feels good and they're in a hurry to get where they're going, and you're the only thing holding them back from experiencing the next exciting adventure around the corner or around the world.
  • Bolt out any open door in the blink of an eye
  • LET ME REPEAT THAT: THEY WILL BOLT OUT ANY OPEN DOOR IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE
  • And won't return until they're good and ready.
  • Sometimes not even then
  • Refuse to come -- unless they want to
  • Refuse to sit -- unless they want to
  • Refuse to stay -- unless they're bored silly, and if so, that's the BEST time to move around to stir up the action anyway
  • Refuse to stop barking -- unless there's something in it for them...like a fabulous treat
  • Refuse to do what you want at the PRECISE moment that it's most important that they do...like when you're trying to show off how obedient and well-trained they are (which is, of course, a grand delusion on your part).

Nor, it seems, has anyone told you:

  • A Cairn can never, ever, ever be trusted off-leash, EVER.
  • Not even for a second. Regardless of how well-trained you have deluded yourself into believing he is
  • That all the dogs you've had before and have trained so well don't matter...if they weren't Cairns.
  • Because Cairns are different.
  • Very different
  • That they're generally NOT the best breed for a home with small children.
  • That one bears repeating: Cairns are generally NOT the best breed for a home with small children.
  • That they're relatively resistant to housebreaking (don't expect them to be housebroken in a week, or even a month)!
  • That Cairns WILL shed a little (or a lot) if you don't groom them properly.
  • And even when you think they're housebroken, if they've got something else on their agenda at the moment, they're likely to conveniently "forget."
  • That they are affectionate -- on their terms, not yours.
  • That they are stubborn and hardheaded, not to mention incredibly independent
  • That obedience training is a necessity, not a luxury. And that it's just the FIRST step in the process.
  • That you should read the previous sentence again, and forget everything you think you know. If you haven't owned a Cairn, it doesn't apply.
  • That they were bred to hunt and kill, and their intense prey drive can NEVER be trained out of them. Toto may not have KILLED those flying monkeys, but that's only because Toto KNEW they were fakes. Otherwise, they'd have been dead, not merely outwitted.

What they SHOULD have told you is:

  • They're wonderful for THE RIGHT OWNER
  • They're loving -- IF YOU LOVE THEM, TREAT THEM WELL, AND HAVE EARNED THEIR RESPECT
  • They're smart -- PROBABLY SMARTER THAN YOU
  • They're sweet -- WHEN THEY WANT TO BE
  • They're funny -- VIRTUALLY ALL THE TIME, IF YOU ENJOY DEMENTED, DEVIOUS, DEVILISH HUMOR
  • They're good with GOOD, WELL-BEHAVED CHILDREN WHO HAVE GOOD, RESPONSIBLE PARENTS. And if they haven't had a bad experience previously with ill-behaved kids. Otherwise, it's a recipe for disaster.
  • They're strong
  • They're hearty
  • They're brave
  • They're relentless
  • They're devious
  • They're insightful
  • They're indomitable
  • They're energetic beyond description
  • They're intelligent beyond belief
  • They're the BEST dog you'll ever own
  • BUT...they just may be the WORST dog you can imagine.

THAT PART IS ALL UP TO YOU!

Oh, and by the way, Toto was actually a GIRL named Terry!

back to top

Q: How long does a typical Cairn live?

A:  

Cairns can live well into their teens, and most are still very active and alert at 10 years of age and older.

back to top

Q: What color are Cairns?

A:  

Cairns come in a variety of colors, ranging from cream to wheaten (straw colored), red, gold, and shades of grey, to almost solid black. Their coat can be almost a single solid color, such as solid wheaten, or it can have a "brindle" coat (multiple colors in the coat, but not spotted). White is not a Cairn color. A "white Cairn" is most likely a West Highland White Terrier, commonly known as a Westie.

All Cairns are attractive, and no color holds special mention. You will love your Cairn whatever the color. A Cairn coat is typically a double coat, with a soft undercoat and a harsh outer coat. You should also be aware that Cairns MAY change color, often several times during their life.

Wheaten, Red Wheaten, Cream Wheaten, Red, Wheaten w/Black Points, Red w/Black Points,  Silver Brindle, Red Brindle, Black Brindle, Silver w/Black Points - and on and on.  There is a Black and Tan color known as Grease or Oil Rag, which is not a good color in the show ring for a Cairn...but most rescue dogs aren't show dogs, but can be AKC registered to perform in agility, obedience, fly ball and earth dog.

back to top

Q: How much do Cairns weigh?

A:  

Cairns typically weigh between 13 and 17 pounds. However, it is not unusual to see a Cairn weighing 20 pounds or slightly more and still be in good weight.  Males tend to be larger in structure than the females.

back to top

Q: Are Cairns good dogs for older people?

A:  

Some Cairns would be wonderful with a senior depending on the individual energy levels of the dog and the people. As a rule, Cairns are an active breed; however, they do mellow some with age. Senior or more mature Cairns are recommended for those in their "golden years."

back to top

Q: Do Cairns get along with other dogs?

A:  

Like humans, that depends on the individual situation. Your Placement Specialist will discuss this with you when you are approved to adopt.

back to top

Q: Do Cairns get along with cats?

A:  

Most of the Cairns we receive are older and already have an established history with or without a reaction to cats. Rescue Cairns who have not previously lived successfully with a cat generally do not get along with a cat, particularly because of their breeding as hunting dogs. Another thing to keep in mind is that just because a Cairn previously lived with a cat, it doesn't necessarily mean it will get along with other cats, since the Cairn may react positively only with its previous cat companion.

For more information on living with Cairns and Cats, see the article: Can Cairns and Cats Live Together Peacefully?

back to top

Q: What medical problems are common to the breed?

A:  

In general, the Cairn is a healthy breed. For more information, see www.cairnterrier.org/reboot/health.html.

One advantage to adopting an older Cairn is that it is easier to determine if there will be any health issues than it is with a young puppy.

back to top

Q: How much grooming will a Cairn require?

A:  

Over all, the Cairn requires less grooming than most other breeds. Routine grooming should include regular brushing, toenail clipping or filing, teeth brushing, and occasional baths. In addition, hand stripping should be done periodically to remove dead hair and permit new hair growth. 

A rescue Cairn is not familiar usually, with a grooming process.  Clipping the coat of a Cairn is truly acceptable and can be done professionally or by the dog owner.  Using the Mars Coat King and Furminator in between clipping will keep your shedding to a sure minimum and keep the coat maintained so that clipping should only occur twice a year.  All necessary grooming supplies that our Cairn owners use can be purchased here:  https://www.cairnrescue.com/store/grooming/?F_All=Y

back to top

Q: Do Cairns need to be on a leash?

A:  

If there is no fenced yard, Cairns must be exercised on a leash. Cairns were bred to hunt and it is impossible to train them to resist the urge to chase squirrels, cats, rabbits, other dogs, etc.

Cairns are NOT suited for invisible fencing because they will most likely take a "hit" in order to chase something through the fence. However, they won't take the hit to get back home. In addition, invisible fencing does not prevent attacks from larger dogs. Likewise, a Cairn should not be left tied out in a yard for the same reason.

A Disease Called Trust

There is a deadly disease stalking your dog, a hideous, stealthy thing just waiting its chance to steal your beloved friend. It is not a new disease, or one for which there are inoculations. The disease is called "Trust".

You knew before you ever took your puppy home that it could not be trusted. The breeder who provided you with this precious animal warned you, drummed it into your head. Puppies steal, destroy anything expensive left in their path, chase cats, take forever to house train, and must never be allowed off lead!!

When the big day finally arrived, heeding the sage advice of the breeder, you escorted your puppy to her new home, properly collared and tagged, the lead held tightly in your hand.

At home, the house was "puppy-proofed" . Everything of value was stored in the spare bedroom, garbage stowed on top of the refrigerator. Cats separated, and a gate placed across the living room to keep at least one part of the house puddle free. All the windows and doors had been properly secured, and signs placed in all strategic points reminding all to "Close the door!"

Soon it becomes second nature to make sure the door closes nine tenths of a second after it was opened and that it is really latched. "Don't let the dog out" is your second most verbalized expression. (The first is "NO!") You worry and fuss constantly, terrified that your darling will get out and disaster will surely follow.

Your friends comment about who you love most, your family or the dog. You know that to relax your vigil for a moment, you might lose her forever.

And so the weeks and months pass, with your puppy becoming more civilized every day, and the seeds of trust are planted. It seems that each new day brings less destruction, less breakage, less leakage. Almost before you know it, your clumsy, wild puppy has turned into an elegant, dignified friend. Now that she is a more reliable, sedate companion, you take her more places. No longer does she chew the steering wheel when left in the car. And darned if that cake wasn't' still on the table this morning. And, oh yes, wasn't that the cat she was sleeping with so cozily on your pillow last night?

At this point you are beginning to become infected, the disease is spreading its roots deep into your mind. And then one of your friends suggest obedience classes, and, after a time, you even let her run loose from the car into the house when you get home.. Why not, she always runs straight to the door, dancing a frenzy of joy and waits to be let in. And, remember she comes every time she is called. You know she is the exception that disproves the rule. (And sometimes late at night, you even let her slip out the front door to go potty and then right back in.)

Years pass - it is hard to remember why you ever worried so much when she was a puppy. She would never think of running out the door left open while you bring in the packages from the car. It would be beneath her dignity to jump out the window of the car while you run into the convenience store. And when you take her for those wonderful long walks at dawn, it only takes one whistle to send her racing back to you in a burst of speed when the walk becomes too close to the highway. (She still gets in the garbage cans, but nobody is perfect!)

This is the time the disease has waited for so patiently. Sometimes it only has to wait a year or two, but often it takes much longer.

She spies the neighbor dog across the street, and suddenly forgets everything she ever knew about not slipping outdoors, jumping out windows or coming when called due to traffic. Perhaps it was only a paper fluttering in the breeze, a squirrel, a passer-by, or even just the sheer joy of running....

Stopped in an instant. Stilled forever - your heart is broken at the sight of her still beautiful body.

The disease is trust. The final outcome, hit by a car.

Every morning my dog bounced around off lead exploring. Every morning for seven years she came back when she was called. She was perfectly obedient, perfectly trustworthy. She died fourteen hours after being hit by a car. Please do not risk your friend and your heart.

Save the trust for things that do not matter..

Please read this every year on your puppy's birthday, lest we forget.

 

back to top

Q: Are Cairns lap dogs?

A:  

In general, Cairns are very loving dogs. Some do tend to be somewhat independent, especially when young, while others may love to sit in your lap for hours. Cairns are a very devoted breed, although most do not "hover" at your every move. Cairns are a mentally strong breed.  They are smart, they will sense your needs as well, and you may not start out with a lap dog, but once that dog figures out your needs, you may eventually have one.

back to top

Q: Are Cairns barkers?

A:  

Some Cairns bark, while others hardly bark at all. In general, Cairns make good watchdogs and will often let you know when there are strangers (or squirrels) in the vicinity.

back to top

Q: Do Cairns dig?

A:  

In general, Cairns will dig. However, some are not interested in digging at all. It depends on the individual dog. By keeping the nails short, and with training, many of those who do dig can learn not to.  Never leaving a Cairn unattended in a fenced yard will insure your "digger" will not work those very strong front paws and get out under your fence!

back to top

Q: Do Cairns like to ride in cars?

A:  

Whether or not a Cairn likes riding in cars depends on the individual dog. Typically a Cairn is not prone to carsickness. A Cairn should either be secured in a seat belt harness or in a crate when traveling in a vehicle. This will protect you and your Cairn in the event of an accident.

back to top

Q: Can you help me with reactions to Fireworks, Gunfire, Thunderstorms?

A:  

Fireworks, Firearms and Thunder...OH MY!

FIRST...........a lot of how a dog reacts to fireworks and thunderstorms depends on how the owner responds to their actions.  If the owner gets upset and frenzied, the dog will amp up their discomfort.

The owner needs to laugh, talk happy, and not make a big deal of it.  Telling the dog "it's fine" in a happy voice and then throw a treat or a high value item (a tiny bit of hot dog, chicken, etc. over and over again! 

MEDS:

3 mg. melatonin should be given at least 1 hr. before a storm or fireworks is anticipated.  It is much better to start the melatonin the day before.  This is holistic med and can be used every day with no side effect whatsoever.  The 3 mg of melatonin can be repeated after 4-5 hrs until the storm/fireworks is over.  IF the 3 mg. does not seem to be helping, then 5 mg. of melatonin can be administered in the same manner.  I'm assuming that melatonin has not been used before so starting out at 3 mg. is the best starting point. 

Rescue Remedy can be used in conjunction with the melatonin.  I prefer the drops that you rub on the ear but there are sprays that you can spray straight into the mouth.  DO NOT use the pill form of Rescue Remedy with the melatonin. 

A thundershirt can help but just a tight childrens shirt may accomplish the same thing.  

MISCELLANEOUS:

It works wonders to put a dog in a bathroom (preferably in the center of the home with no windows) in their crate.  Turn on the exhaust fan and play the radio at a fairly high volume to drown out the outside noises. 

It also works to put a dog in a laundry room with a fan and the radio playing.  Normally the laundry room has no windows and can be closed off to drown outside noises. 

We would suggest to try the bathroom or laundry room first with 3 mg. of melatonin.  I would first try it without a shirt as crates can get warm BUT if the dog still seems agitated then add the shirt. 

The "Look At Me" technique has also worked for some.  You teach the dog "look at me" and when they do - treat and high praise.  This takes time and patience to actually work during storms/fireworks/walks.

back to top

Q: How can I make sure my Cairn are taken care of by CP in the event of my death

A:  

IN THE EVENT OF MY DEATH, PLEASE CONTACT COL. POTTER CAIRN RESCUE NETWORK FOR THE CARE OF MY CAIRNS

If you already have a will, make what is called a codicil.  A written addition to have the responsible party contact Col. Potter by sending an email to cpcrn@cairnrescue.com (monitored daily) or the emergency number 1.866.506.7461.

Make sure, if you wish to donate for your Cairns to Col. Potter, you have a responsible party go to the donations page:  https://www.cairnrescue.com/about/ways-to-donate-to-col-potter/, selecting the appropriate area to make the donation.

It is advised that you fill out the owner surrender form and keep it with your other dog information, so that there is a written record of your dogs health, habits, feeding regimen, etc. https://www.cairnrescue.com/rescue/owner-surrender/, But do not submit this form, fill it in and print it for your records.

You can go to our Café Press store and order the refrigerator magnet:  http://www.cafepress.com/colpottercairn/13612200  or other items, for clear viewing in your home, in the event something happens to you in an emergency situation. 

This is for placing your dogs with Col. Potter, into our foster program, to find them a new forever home.

Thank you!

 

back to top

Q: Is there a legal document I can use for estate planning for my Cairn(s)?

A:  

ESTATE PLANNING, WILLS AND SUCH

Keeping your dogs safe, after you're gone

WILL PROVISIONS FOR LEAVING CAIRNS TO CPCRN

Because most if not all states' laws treat animals as personal property, a good

way to handle this issue is to include in your will: "I give, devise, and

bequeath my cherished Cairn Terrier, (name), to Col. Potter Cairn Rescue

Network, a New York not-for-profit corporation ( www.cairnrescue.com)."

 

A more global bequest, which would prevent having to rewrite a will after a

Cairn has crossed the bridge, would be "I give, devise, and bequeath any and

all Cairn Terriers in my possession at the time of my death to Col. Potter

Cairn Rescue Network, a New York n ot-for-p rofit corporation (www.cairnrescue.com)."

 

To help assure that the bequest is honored, the gift of the Cairn should

include a gift of money to provide for care of the Cairn. This could be

accomplished by establishing a simple trust, in a money amount of your

choosing, in your will. Such a trust migh t read:

 

I give, devise and bequeath the sum of ___________ ($_______) for the care of

my Cairn Terrier(s), to be paid over to the Board of Directors of Col. Potter

Cairn Rescue Network, as Trustee, for the use and benefit of the objects of the

Trust established as follows:

 

A. The Trustee of this Trust shall be the Board of Directors of Col. Potter

Cairn Rescue Network (“CPCRN”), a New York not-for-profit corporation

(www.cairnrescue.com). This Trust shall run for the benefit of my Cairn Terrier

(s) until he/she is placed in a suitable adoptive home selected by CPCRN.

During the continuance of the Trust, the Trustee shall pay to or for the care,

support, medical needs, and maintenance of my Cairn Terrier(s) so much of the

net income and principal of the trust estate as it, in its sole discretion,

shall determine to be in my Cairn Terrier(s)’ best interests. Any undistributed

income shall be added to and made a part of principal.

B. Upon placement of my Cairn Terrier(s) in a suitable adoptive home by CPCRN,

the Trust shall terminate and the Trustee shall distribute any remaining funds

to CPCRN for its Cairn Terrier rescue activities, to be used as the Board of

Directors of CPCRN shall determine.

 

C. This Trust may be terminated earlier than the time otherwise provided herein

if and when the Trustee, in its discretion, determines that such action should

be taken due to circumstances not known or contemplated during my lifetime,

including, but not limited to, significant depletion of trust assets or changes

in laws which may negate trust purposes.

 

D. The trustee is vested with full ti tle to all of the property and estate

hereby given, devised and bequeathed to the Trust until the termination of the

Trust and until the trust property shall be actually paid over, transferred and

delivered according to the above terms.

 

< span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Comic Sans MS";color:#7030A0;">It would be best to discuss the suggested provisions with your attorney, if you

have one, who could modify specific language in accordance with a given state's

laws, if necessary.

 

Pamela S. Burt, Attorney at Law, CPCRN Legal

 

Written correspondence send to

CPCRN

c/o Danielle Rackstraw

PO Box 1354

Menifee CA 92585-1354

back to top

Adoption

Q: How does your adoption process work?

A:  

Col. Potter Cairn Rescue Network (CPCRN) adoption process is a 4-step process:

  1. You must submit an on-line Adoption Application (in full) for review by our Adoption Committee. PLEASE NOTE: If your Application is not complete, it cannot be processed.
  2. A thorough reference check will be conducted in which we contact the references you gave us in your Application. A member of our Communications Team will contact all of your references, as well as your veterinary reference. A telephone interview with you may be conducted. After this, a reference report will be submitted to the Adoption Committee for review.
  3. A home safety inspection must be conducted and a report submitted to the Adoption Committee for review.
  4. Once the first 3 steps have been completed, the Adoption Committee will vote on your Application and a Committee member will officially notify you of the results.

If you are approved to adopt a dog from us, we will make every attempt to match you and your family with the Cairn best suited for you. Our Placement Services Team is prepared to help find you a Cairn that is suitable to your family’s needs. A Placement Specialist will be assigned to work with you individually to find the right dog for you. Finally, once a dog has been found that is determined to be the best match, you will be asked to talk to the foster parent of that dog. This is your chance to ask all the hard questions about the dog and to learn as much as you can before final adoption approval for that particular dog is granted. After you have spoken with the foster home the Director of Placement Services will discuss with you the final adoption approval decision. CPCRN cannot “hold” or “promise” any dog for any Applicant until official adoption approval for that dog has been granted by the Committee and an Adoption Contract has been tendered to an Applicant. Any change in status of the dog on the Available Dogs page prior to you talking to a foster family will mean the dog is being adopted by another family.

Here is a video that may help to understand the process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xASnbetPkEA

back to top

Q: How long does the adoption process normally take?

A:  

After your Application has been submitted and received by the Committee, the entire process can take approximately 2 or 3 weeks. However, you can help us speed the process along by answering all the questions on the Application in detail and alerting your personal references that our Reference Coordinator will be contacting them by phone for a reference check. Delays are often encountered when we cannot reach an Applicant's references or their Applications are incomplete. Please verify all telephone numbers and e-mail addresses prior to submitting your application.

Of course during peak holiday periods and vacation times, it can take longer as we are all volunteers and have jobs and other life functions, outside of rescue.

 

back to top

Q: Can I adopt a dog from another part of the Country?

A:  

Yes. It is preferable for the adoptive family to travel to the foster home to adopt the dog. Occasionally, the adoptive family and the foster caregiver will each travel part of the way and meet in between at a specified location. Of course, this will depend upon the schedule of the foster caregiver and his/her ability to travel. Not all foster homes can travel to transport their foster dogs. Occasionally, CPCRN can help to arrange a "transportation chain" where the dog is passed from one volunteer to the next: each person taking the dog an agreed-upon distance until the dog finally gets to his or her "forever home." When any of our volunteers (including the foster home) helps transport the dog any portion of the journey to its adoptive family, we ask for a 15¢ per mile round-trip NON-tax-deductible donation to help defray the cost of rescue and transportation. Dogs can also be shipped on most major airlines or taken on the plane by the adoptive owner. The costs associated with airline transportation are normally between $300 and $400 (not including the cost of a human ticket if in-cabin transportation is selected), depending upon the airline and the route. It all depends upon the circumstances as well as the dog itself. Some dogs would not do well travelling by air, and others would be just fine. CP will not 'ship' puppies. Some foster homes have the time to travel a few hours to meet the adoptive family and some do not. Occasionally the airlines will not fly animals due to extreme heat or cold. This is always a consideration. We try to do everything we can to place the right dog in the perfect home. We will work with you in that regard, however, we ask that you give careful consideration to the rescue dog's location and how you might be able to transport him or her to your home should you be approved to adopt.

back to top

Q: Are Cairns good with children and does CPCRN adopt Rescues to families with children?

A:  

Cairns can make excellent family pets. However, because the rescue's life history and prior experience with children is rarely known, Col. Potter Cairn Rescue Network does not adopt rescue Cairns to families with children under the age of 12. Very rare exceptions may be made if we have a detailed history of the rescue Cairn and its history with children. In these exceptional cases, only families with current or recent experience with Cairn terriers would be considered, and all children in the home must be over 8 years of age.

Our Cairn rescues have already suffered at least one, and often more than one disruption in their lives. Our mission is to assure that their placement is a successful one. Virtually all rescues come into rescue with at least some emotional "baggage," and Cairns being Cairns, will often attempt to assert their place in the family "pack" shortly after being adopted. Loving and gentle children, who have been raised to treat animals with respect and care, can rarely assume the role of "alpha" in the family "pack" over a Cairn Terrier, especially one who is trying very hard to establish his or her place in the hierarchy of the family.

It is also important to note that small dogs in general, and terriers specifically, can become over-stimulated around small children who run, scream, cry, pat them on the head, pull their fur, ears, tails, or make sudden movements. Cairns who have not been raised in a household with children can become agitated or over-protective when they hear children's high-pitched, excited voices or hear them crying. Cairn Terriers were bred to chase, hunt, and kill vermin, therefore they have a very strong "prey drive." This instinct, which is virtually impossible to train or breed out of them, results in their chasing anything that runs or moves quickly, as children often do. It also, sadly, can lead to tragic accidents if children inadvertently leave doors open or ajar. Cairns will instinctively chase rabbits, squirrels, bunnies, birds, etc., as well as bicycles, rollerbladers, scooters, papers fluttering down the street and other moving objects, animate and inanimate. Therefore, close supervision and secure containment as well as being ON LEASH at all times is paramount to their safety.

It is our recommendation that families with children under the age of 12 who are interested in adding a Cairn terrier to their home seek out a reputable breeder. Here is a link to Cairn Terrier Breeder Referral: www.CairnTerrier.org

back to top

Q: How can I visit the dog I want to adopt?

A:  

All of our foster homes are volunteers who have families, jobs, and dogs of their own. Often, they have more than one foster Cairn in their care. In order to reduce their workload, visits and phone calls from applicants who are not yet approved to adopt a dog are not permitted. Once you have completed the approval process and are approved to adopt one of our Cairns, you will be put in touch with the foster home to discuss the dog you're interested in adopting. Until then, we will answer any questions you may have about any of the dogs in our rescue program.  We do not have a brick and mortar facility because we are national and our dogs are fostered in homes all across the US.

back to top

Q: What if I see more than 1 dog that I am interested in adopting?

A:  

By all means, if you see more than one CPCRN dog that you might like to adopt or learn more about, please notify the Placement Specialist of your interest.  Once your application is processed and your HSV is completed and approved, you will be sent a questionnaire to fill out.  Once that is done and submitted, you will be assigned a matchmaker to coordinate your adoption.

back to top

Q: I want to apply to adopt a Cairn, but I don't see one on your website at the moment that I am interested in adopting. What do I do?

A:  

We do not have you list dogs you are interested in on your application because we currently adopt out about a dog a day. Please fill out the Adoption Application and once you are approved to adopt from CPCRN, a Placement Specialist will be assigned to assist you in finding the right Cairn for you.  Remember, there are several dogs in the wings waiting to be listed as available.

back to top

Q: How often do you get puppies in Rescue?

A:  

Puppies and dogs under the age of two don't come into the Rescue program very often.  But when they do, there is usually a long list of folks waiting for that age range, and a match may be made even before the dog is officially listed on our website.

back to top

Q: Are Cairns housebroken?

A:  

Whether or not a rescue Cairn is housebroken depends on the individual situation. All rescue Cairns MUST HAVE a crate, and the owners are urged to train the Cairn as one would a puppy for the first several months regardless of whether the Cairn was housebroken before or not. Good beginnings make for happy endings, and it is better to reinforce the desired behavior from the start rather than try to backtrack and retrain later. Cairns are a smart breed and will learn the rules if the owner takes the time to properly train.

back to top

Q: Why can't I adopt a Cairn Rescue if I have electric fencing? My other dogs have been trained with it.

A:  

Many of our Rescues are escape artists, which is how they came into Rescue in the first place. Electric fencing is NOT recommended for anyone with a Cairn Terrier (Rescue or otherwise) for two primary reasons:

  1. Cairns will often take the electric-shock "hit" if they see something they consider prey (like a squirrel or bunny), but they will NOT take the "hit" to return to their yard. Therefore, they're in danger of being lost or killed by a car.
  2. Electric fencing does NOT prevent other, often larger, dogs from entering the Cairn's property; Cairns are sometimes killed or severely injured by dogs from which they cannot escape. Add to that the fact that most Cairn Rescues have NOT been trained with electric fencing since they were young, and it's a potential tragedy waiting to happen.

Cairns must be ON LEASH at all times or they must be contained by secure fencing. Therefore, we do not adopt our Rescue Cairns to anyone with electric fencing as their primary means of containment.

A Disease Called Trust

There is a deadly disease stalking your dog, a hideous, stealthy thing just waiting its chance to steal your beloved friend. It is not a new disease, or one for which there are inoculations. The disease is called "Trust".

You knew before you ever took your puppy home that it could not be trusted. The breeder who provided you with this precious animal warned you, drummed it into your head. Puppies steal, destroy anything expensive left in their path, chase cats, take forever to house train, and must never be allowed off lead!!

When the big day finally arrived, heeding the sage advice of the breeder, you escorted your puppy to her new home, properly collared and tagged, the lead held tightly in your hand.

At home, the house was "puppy-proofed" . Everything of value was stored in the spare bedroom, garbage stowed on top of the refrigerator. Cats separated, and a gate placed across the living room to keep at least one part of the house puddle free. All the windows and doors had been properly secured, and signs placed in all strategic points reminding all to "Close the door!"

Soon it becomes second nature to make sure the door closes nine tenths of a second after it was opened and that it is really latched. "Don't let the dog out" is your second most verbalized expression. (The first is "NO!") You worry and fuss constantly, terrified that your darling will get out and disaster will surely follow.

Your friends comment about who you love most, your family or the dog. You know that to relax your vigil for a moment, you might lose her forever.

And so the weeks and months pass, with your puppy becoming more civilized every day, and the seeds of trust are planted. It seems that each new day brings less destruction, less breakage, less leakage. Almost before you know it, your clumsy, wild puppy has turned into an elegant, dignified friend. Now that she is a more reliable, sedate companion, you take her more places. No longer does she chew the steering wheel when left in the car. And darned if that cake wasn't' still on the table this morning. And, oh yes, wasn't that the cat she was sleeping with so cozily on your pillow last night?

At this point you are beginning to become infected, the disease is spreading its roots deep into your mind. And then one of your friends suggest obedience classes, and, after a time, you even let her run loose from the car into the house when you get home.. Why not, she always runs straight to the door, dancing a frenzy of joy and waits to be let in. And, remember she comes every time she is called. You know she is the exception that disproves the rule. (And sometimes late at night, you even let her slip out the front door to go potty and then right back in.)

Years pass - it is hard to remember why you ever worried so much when she was a puppy. She would never think of running out the door left open while you bring in the packages from the car. It would be beneath her dignity to jump out the window of the car while you run into the convenience store. And when you take her for those wonderful long walks at dawn, it only takes one whistle to send her racing back to you in a burst of speed when the walk becomes too close to the highway. (She still gets in the garbage cans, but nobody is perfect!)

This is the time the disease has waited for so patiently. Sometimes it only has to wait a year or two, but often it takes much longer.

She spies the neighbor dog across the street, and suddenly forgets everything she ever knew about not slipping outdoors, jumping out windows or coming when called due to traffic. Perhaps it was only a paper fluttering in the breeze, a squirrel, a passer-by, or even just the sheer joy of running....

Stopped in an instant. Stilled forever - your heart is broken at the sight of her still beautiful body.

The disease is trust. The final outcome, hit by a car.

Every morning my dog bounced around off lead exploring. Every morning for seven years she came back when she was called. She was perfectly obedient, perfectly trustworthy. She died fourteen hours after being hit by a car. Please do not risk your friend and your heart.

Save the trust for things that do not matter..

Please read this every year on your puppy's birthday, lest we forget.

 

 

back to top

Q: How much does it cost to own a Cairn?

A:  

The major expense of caring for a Cairn is its food and preventive medical care. Some Cairns are sensitive to wheat, corn, or beef and need a special diet, such as lamb and rice. This type of food can be found in most pet supply stores, but not in grocery stores.

Cairns may also develop common canine diseases such as rabies, distemper, kennel cough, or worms just through contact with other dogs or the fecal matter of other dogs. Also, during warm weather, dogs are susceptible to heartworms that develop from being bitten by mosquitoes in some parts of the country. Appropriate vaccinations and medication can prevent all of these problems.

Cairns should also be hand stripped to maintain the health of their skin and coat, so if you do not plan to do this yourself, you should add a groomers fee to your expenses.  But clipping is also acceptable, based on the need of the owner and the dog.

Of course, you will want to have the proper leash and collar and toys to keep your Cairn out of trouble. Yes, toys will keep him out of trouble as they give him something to do (and chew) that will prevent unwanted attention to your best shoes or rug. After a Cairn is properly housebroken, he will need some type of bed if he does not sleep on yours or in his crate.

The costs for normal care of a healthy dog run about $30-50 a month. If you travel and your Cairn does not go with you, you will also need to figure in some type of care for him while you are gone.

We would like to remind you that a dog of any breed may develop diseases same as humans such as cancer, heart problems, arthritis, diabetes, incontinence, etc. These diseases are not transmittable to humans. We bring this issue up only to make you aware that you might want to consider how you would handle the situation if your dog develops problems due to age or illness.

back to top

Q: Is there a charge for a Rescue?

A:  

At the time you adopt one of our rescue Cairns, you will be asked to make a donation to CPCRN. This donation helps defray shelter fees and other costs paid to procure our Rescues, the cost of transporting them to our foster homes, the costs of providing them with food and appropriate veterinary care, including spay/neuter, immunizations, heart worm testing and prevention, and other medical and/or grooming needs as are required by the particular dogs in our program. The requested adoption donations for our Cairns are:    

  • Under one year old $400
  • One year to three years $375
  • Four and Five years $350
  • Six to eight years $250
  • Eight and nine years $200
  • Seniors 10 years or older $100

If a puppy is not altered prior to placement (which would typically be the case if the puppy is under 6 months), we also require that the adopting family agree to a spay/neuter deposit which is FULLY refundable upon presentation and verification of a spay/neuter certificate. This is further explained in the rescue protocol for young puppies, which you will receive if you are applying for a pup under six months of age. Please verify the requested donation amount on any dog that you are considering for adoption. As adoption donations do not constitute purchase monies paid for the Rescue, they are not refundable in the event that you decide to return the Rescue or for any other reason.

back to top

Q: Can someone in the organization help select the right dog for me?

A:  

Yes! If you are approved to adopt a dog from our organization, you will be assigned to a member of our Placement Services Team. A Placement Services Specialist will work with you to find a Cairn that matches your family’s wants and needs.

back to top

Q: Do I have to select a dog in order to submit an Application?

A:  

No! If you have determined that the Cairn terrier breed is right for you, please submit your Application now. We encourage you to fill out an Application even if you do not currently see a Cairn on our site that seems to fit your family’s needs. Our website is updated regularly due to the large number of Cairns that we rescue and rehome. We are currently adopting out about three Cairns a week, so there is a lot of turnover. If you are approved to adopt, you will be assigned to a Placement Services Specialist (known as a Matchmaker) who will work with you until we find you a Cairn to love! It is at that time you have the option to request an available dog by name. The Placement Specialist will be able to give you more information on that dog. Our goal is to get the right dog for your family, but equally the right family for each dog. Please note: Any change in status of the dog on the Available Dogs page prior to you talking to a foster family will mean the dog is being adopted by another family.

back to top

Foster

Q: What is a Foster Home?

A:  

Because Col. Potter is a National organization and does not have a brick and mortar facility, a foster home is the backbone of our organization.  A foster home is a temporary home for a Cairn Terrier or Cairn Terrier mix. The majority of Cairn Terriers that come into rescue require a temporary foster home prior to being adopted by a new owner. Without foster homes, the majority of Cairn Terriers that end up in shelters or are abandoned or given up by their owners would be euthanized. Foster homes are the backbone of any rescue program. Your becoming a foster home is most welcome.

back to top

Q: How long could I have a foster Cairn?

A:  

The answer to this question is typically unknown. The length of time a dog is in any foster home depends upon the area in which the dog is being fostered, the condition or age of the dog, and the circumstances that brought the dog into rescue in the first place. Foster home care can be as short as a "Bed and Biscuit" during a transport, but generally it is two weeks for evaluation, then one or more months before a dog is matched for an adoption. In the case of a dog that is rescued and who needs medical care or social rehabilitation, it can be much longer. Some dogs do stay in foster care for over a year if they have significant health or behavioral issues. CPCRN does not set an artificial limit to the length a dog will be in care. As a foster home, YOU have the ability to tell us the type of foster dog you can care for and the length of time you can foster.

back to top

Q: How can I be a foster home if I have no experience?

A:  

If you have common sense, general pet knowledge, room for a foster dog and the desire to be a foster home, you can become a foster home once the below application is filled out and you have been approved by CPCRN. We work with you every step of the way so that you never feel that you are without proper direction and guidance in any aspect of your fostering. Please join CairnRescueMentoring@yahoogroups.com: a learning site for those who work or wish to work Cairn rescue. For information about fostering puppy mill rescues, take a look at Rehabilitation of a Puppy Mill Dog.

back to top

Can't find what you are looking for?

Click here to ask your own question.